Promise, Dream Horse

Promise, an elegant leggy filly.

She is a prophesy of her breeding and bright future.

Currently showing at the Montrose Arts Center.  Promise has been entered in the Montrose Visual Art Guild Annual Exhibition, October 9-13, 2019 at Camelot Gardens, Hwy 550, Montrose, CO.

Mixed media: ceramic body,  forsythia legs, metallic, acrylic, and enamel finishes, copper wire, wood base.  18″ x 14″ x 4″  $250  Purchase through Montrose Center for the Arts: (970) 252-0241, or visit the center at 219 E Main St, Montrose, CO 81401.Promise

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Galaxy, Dream Horse

Galaxy is the eternal horse; he glows in subtle shades of the blue heaven above. Visit Galaxy and Liberté  at the 610 Arts Collective on Clinton Street, Ridgway Colorado. Hours: Monday-Saturday 10:00 am-5:00 pm. Each sculptures is 18″ tall; $250.

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Mixed media process includes ceramic sculpture, integrated legs from cured forsythia, multilayered surfaces including hand-rubbed metallic finish, copper wire hair treatments, and enameled wooded bases.

If not in the area, purchase and shipping can be arranged by calling the Gallery and speaking to Trisha: 970-318-0150 or visiting this link: purchase a Dream Horse

Liberté, Dream Horse Sculpture

Introducing Liberté, completed on the 4th of July.  His hand rubbed metallic finish is evocative of the copper patina on the Statue of Liberty.  With an explosion of fireworks in his mane and tail, he symbolizes a celebration of freedom, both freedom of the wild horse, as well as freedom the United States guarantees its citizens.  This sculpture is dedicated “with liberty and justice for all,” especially for the least of us.

Mixed media sculpture includes ceramic body with textured patterns, cured forsythia legs, various proprietary compounds that blend forsythia to ceramic body, acrylic base coat,  metallic hand rubbed finish, acrylic clear coat, black enameled wooden base, and copper wire hair finish.  To learn more about this sculpture process, visit this link: Dream Horse process

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You can visit/view Liberté at the 610 Arts Collective in Ridgway CO.  To purchase this free spirited celebratory horse, contact Trisha at the 610 Gallery,  970-318-0150.

 

Dream Horse Equine Sculptures

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Meet Sazerac, the first horse in my new mixed media equine sculpture series.  Sazerac is a jazzy horse, inspired by New Orleans.  He’s mellow as a fine whiskey with a touch of fire.

Requiring many steps to complete, my mixed media sculptures are a journey of art, fine craft, decision making, and most importantly playful creation.  The horses begin with a foraging trip to find legs from the many trees and shrubs on my property.  I like to use fruit wood and flowering shrubs, which are easy to shape while green and become quite hard during the drying process.  The legs for this series are exclusively forsythia.  As I forage, I am looking for limbs which suggest the anatomy of the horse, bumps and protrusions that echo fetlocks, chestnuts, hocks, knees, etc.  From my basket of gatherings, I sort legs into fronts and backs; then I find pairs that go together.  These groupings are sized, then bundled together for drying.  Some of the legs are shaped while green to push the suggestion of animation.

After the sets of legs are determined, I begin to sculpt the horses with a white clay body.  Each horse evolves organically, with its own gestures and personality.  Using a variety of found objects, I press a pattern into the soft clay.  Then I position the legs as they will appear after firing, checking for balance, anatomy, and temperament.  I note which legs will go with each horse before I remove them for drying and firing.  Drying the wood, as well as the clay takes patience- at least a month.

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After the clay is fired, each set of legs is permanently attached to the selected horse using a special adhesive, allowing 24 hours to cure before sculpting the final musculature where legs join the horse’s trunk.   Over time, with much experimentation, I have developed a proprietary  compound that stays soft long enough to build the muscles and flesh, blending legs into the horse’s body, then dries hard and  bonds to the fired clay.  As everything cures, the horses get their own paddock to keep them safe.  As you can see from the photo, the drying process involves shrinkage, so sometimes another coat of the blended compound is applied to the upper legs before the finish work begins.IMG_9927After everything is dry, each horse gets a base coat of black acrylic paint.  When dry, each horse is hand rubbed with colored metallic pigments, and sealed with clear acrylic glaze.

I enjoy watching the interaction of the horses in their paddock after each application.  The copper green horse seems “buddied” to the red horse.  When all receive their finishes, they again come back together as a herd.  When the sealer is dry, I use a fine gauge wire to create hairstyles and attitude for each horse.  In the preview, you can see a close up view of Sazerac, detailing his pressed clay texture, metallic finish, articulation of limbs merging wooden legs with ceramic body, and copper wire mane.

Sazerac was shown at the 610 Arts Collective in Ridgway and sold in August.  Please contact Trisha: 970-318-0150 to learn of available Dream Horse Sculptures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Place Award at “Ridgway Open”

My painting, “Una Calle Vieja, San Miguel de Allende,” (An Old Street), received 2nd Place at the Weehawken Arts “Ridgway Open” last Sunday night, April 14th.  The show runs through the end of May at Weehawken’s exhibition space, the 610 Arts Collective, 610 Clinton, St, Ridgway, CO 81432.  610 Arts Collective

I’m getting stronger 3 months post-op, and beginning to participate in art events and finally able to make art again.  The painting, “Una Calle Vieja, San Miguel de Allende,” was actually repainted just a week before I entered it in the “Ridgway Open” show. Last year when I originally painted it, I was never happy with the composition. To me it felt unresolved, and I wasn’t sure how to correct that. On that inspired day,  I revisted the painting.  I decided to go back into the painting with pure Windsor red- an opaque pigment- in the shadowed background areas. It was just what I needed, pulling all the red areas together. Then I used manganese blue- another opaque color in the foreground shadows where the road tiles create a linear movement into the heart of the painting. Wow! Cool- using opaque pigments to lead the eye into the focal point and around the painting.  Overpainting with opaque pigments also made a good vehicle for bringing unity to the red/blue accents found throughout the painting. I love it when experimentation leads to new understanding.

 

In deciding what to enter, I decided to showcase my travel work.  The second piece I entered was “A Break in the Clouds,” which was accepted last year, May 2018, for exhibition at the Colorado Watercolor Society annual national exhibition of water media.  It also received 3rd place at the Montrose Visual Arts Guild annual show, October 2018.  These paintings complement each other with the San Miguel piece executed in warm glowing colors and deep shadows, while the Nicaragua painting features cool colors, sunlight, and strong contrasts.

Both paintings are 16″ x 20″ watercolor on paper, framed under glass, $350 each.  Paintings can be purchased by contacting the 610 Arts Collective, 970-318-0150.  If you are local to the Western Slope of Colorado, take a drive to Ridgway and check out the entire show.  Spring is in full glory, and the drive is spectacular.

Happy Valentines Day

As I progress with my rehab, I was able to begin making art again.  My stamina and focus are not back to normal yet, so I planned a simple project: series of graphic Valentines based on grid design.  All except the final design were built from the center to outside border.  The black checkerboard patterns were designed with an eye for a pleasing balance of “white space,” figure/ground.  Then the red accents were added.  For the final design, I knew I wanted a graphic border with a heart inside, so that final Valentine was designed from the outside border inward towards the center heart.

Yesterday was Galentines Day, celebrating the friendship of women.  I made a card for each of my Book Buddies and brought them to my book group last night.  The feature image I saved for my husband.  He has been a blessing in my care and rehab.

Though I’m not 100%, I look forward to returning to the process of making art.

 

Knee Replacement: patience & forbearance

Thank you for following me.  It’s been some time since I have posted.  I haven’t fallen off the face of the earth.  I spent the end of 2018 with family holidays and prepping for total left knee replacement.  I worked out regularly so I would go into my surgery strong and fit, focusing on cardio and core strength; balance and flexibility.  On January 9, I had my surgery for an injury that initially occurred 50 years ago, with repeated injuries and surgeries.  It was finally time to get my knee fixed.  It has been a challenge doing the rehab for a leg whose soft tissues on the outside of the left leg had shortened over the course of those long years.  I’m learning how to walk again with balance, deal with the muscle spasms and cramping that come with the hard work of physical therapy.  Slowly I am getting my mobility back, as I develop the patience and forbearance of a difficult recovery .  Stay with me while I heal and regain use of my leg.  When I am well enough, I will be working on new ideas, new techniques, and a new way of expressing myself.IMG_1672

Live Demo GAC Friday 9/7/18

I’ve been exploring a new way to sketch, synthesizing many different approaches and methods using a variety of media in a large 12″x18″ format.  I will be demonstrating this new direction at Art Walk Fest, at the Gunnison Arts Center, this Friday, September 7th from 5:00-8:00 PM.1d1bce26-9f90-4afb-9b2e-cf818b25c9cb

In my never-ending quest to become more and more loose, I am sketching directly with watercolor or pastel, then developing form and structure from the loose shapes I set on paper.  In studying the sketches of the Masters, one can see places where the artist is searching for “the line;” the place where the contour line makes the shape correct.  Then by adding value, the form can emerge.

For me, these exercises are like a scientist performing experiments, getting results, and acting on the data sets. I will use this experience to begin painting in oils.  I want my oils to be loose and direct, not layered and classical, with a build up of glazes.

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Join me in Gunnison Friday night.  My sketches from this past week will be available for $50 each.

I began the week using white gouache with watercolor, sketching with my brush directly on the watercolor pad.  Later, I progressed to sketching with pastel, and adding watercolor or watercolor & gouache washes over the pastel contour lines.  In my most recent composition, I have made an underpainting of pastel.  I plan to add the watercolor washes on Friday.  Come out to see the results of this experiment.  For now, I’ve been painting horses.  On Friday, I plan to also sketch a few flowers, as time allows.

Beginning Friday during Art Walk and continuing through the month of September, I will offer all my matted bin work at 50% off.  These works are

backed with foam core and ready for your frame.  This is a great opportunity to become a collector of my artwork.  I look forward to seeing you this Friday evening.  Besides Art in Action, a full range of Art Walk activities are offered, including a free concert featuring Niceness.

Poured Watercolor Workshop” Telluride Sept. 22-24

Do you strive for luminous color in your watercolor paintings?  Knowing pigment properties and following simple pigment rules go a long way in achieving colors that sing.  Pouring paints, instead of using a brush, further ensures that each layer remains undisturbed, allowing a build up of color with a depth that positively glows!

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I am offering a Poured Watercolor workshop September 22-24, 2018 in Telluride.  We will combine studio time masking, pouring, and painting with field work capturing the natural beauty of the Colorado high country.

 

 

 

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Learn how color properties can enhance your paintings, including pigment characteristics, color theory, and pouring techniques.  This workshop will give you strategies for improving your paintings by focusing on composition, value, edges, and of course, color!

 

Tuition is $200, which includes four days of instruction, thorough coverage of watercolor pouring techniques and color theory, guidance and coaching for all levels of painters, art principles, supportive critiques, and a 12 page illustrated reference book.

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This workshop is strictly limited to 6 participants.  Register today: WORKSHOP REGISTRATION LINK  to ensure your spot.  Make new friends, discover your muse in a relaxing setting, create art in beautiful surroundings, grow as an artist by learning new techniques, stretch, laugh, explore, support, participate, flourish, sparkle, dream,  ……….

This workshop is appropriate for all skill levels.  With a small class size and an intimate setting, beginners will receive the support to rapidly improve, and advanced artists will receive challenges to take their painting to the next level.aspen

 

 

POURED WATERCOLOR WORKSHOP

w/CHERI ISGREEN

SEPTEMBER  22, 23, 24, 2018

TELLURIDE, CO

WORKSHOP REGISTRATION LINK

 

 

Upon registration, you will receive a materials list, the instructional booklet, and several links for more information about poured watercolors.  Come paint with us… relax…create…explore…grow…make new friends…laugh…play…discover…invent…enjoy…

Inexpensive lodging can be found on Air B&B, Telluride, Colorado.  I can help you connect with a roommate for the workshop.

 

Poured Watercolor Demo

For the month of August, I am the featured artist at the Gunnison Arts Center.  I decided to do a painting demonstration for the First Friday Art Walk.  Working on three subjects: a chile market in Dolores Hidalgo, Mexico; a series of flamenco dancers; and a Norwegian Fiord horse, I need to decide which piece will be the subject of my demo.  I choose the Fiord horse, because Gunnison hashas a strong horse culture and tradition.  Additionally, I am well known for my equine paintings, so this gives my audience an insight into how I work.  Studying the ink value drawing, I decide the painting’s design lends itself to the poured watercolor method.  This will be a crowd pleasing technique!  When the paper is wet and the paint is flowing, exciting mixtures and effects occur.

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The Norwegian Fiord has a distinctive black and white mane and tail, along with a dorsal stripe running from the end of the mane to the beginning of the tail.  The goal of my study is to spotlight the Fiord’s unusual and distinctive markings.

 

 

 

 

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After mounting my watercolor paper on a sturdy board, I transfer my drawing to the paper and mask the areas that will remain white.   When the mask is thoroughly dry, I pour the first layer using light values of permanent rose, raw sienna, and manganese blue.  These pigments will be my primaries for this painting- (red, yellow, and blue).  Using my drawing study, (above), as my value map, I mask the areas I want to remain light.  I use both a mask pen for small areas and a mask brush for larger areas.

When the second mask is dry, the painting is ready for the medium value pour.  This I will do in Gunnison at the Arts Center during the First Friday Art Walk.  The colors are bright and dramatic, eliciting ooo’s and aaaah’s from the audience.

fiord5For the final dark layer, I choose to apply color loosely with a large mop brush.  I mix colors wet-into-wet directly on the paper in selected areas where the Fiord’s distinctive black stripes appear.

I’m not concerned with a realistic reproduction of the horse’s markings.  A camera can do that job.  My objective is to celebrate the unique and instantly identifiable beauty of the Norwegian Fiord.  For this purpose, I am using bright colors in darker values than previous layers.  At this point, I must wait for the paint to dry thoroughly before I can remove the mask.  Because it is getting late at the Arts Center, I plan to do the next steps at home.

Above Right, I begin removing all the mask layers.  This is my favorite part of the process.  I feel like I am unwrapping a gift as the image begins to emerge beneath the mask.  With the mask removed, the hard work of pulling all the elements together to refine and resolve the painting begins.  I spend as much time studying the painting as I do applying paint.

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“Good Hair Day”  framed 20″x16″  $350  To purchase visit: PURCHASE LINK