“After School”

This painting was inspired by our winter trip to Mexico and my travel sketch journal.  Notice the strong connection between the mother and daughter.  Even with her back turned from the viewer, you can feel the strong attraction the daughter feels for her mother after a day at school.  It appears that this reunion occurs at this alcove daily.

Preliminary study in ink

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Preliminary study in ink
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Work in progress
After School
“After School”  watercolor, 15″ x 11″  $400
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Workshop Update

Have you registered for “Getting Loose” watercolor workshops?  Workshops are offered in Montrose and Gunnison.

  • Oct. 22  10 AM – 3 PM (with working brown bag lunch)  Gunnison Arts Center  Workshop #1- Harvest themes; benefit for Gunnison Arts Center
  • Nov. 5  2-6 PM  Montrose: Cedar Creek Clubhouse #1- Harvest themes; benefit for Montrose Center for the Arts
  • Nov. 13 10 AM – 3 PM (with working brown bag lunch)  Gunnison Arts Center  Workshop #1- Holiday themes; benefit for Gunnison Arts Center
  • Dec. 10  2-6 PM  Montrose: Cedar Creek Clubhouse #1- Holiday themes; benefit for Montrose Center for the Arts
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format #1- long & skinny

Students in the Harvest Workshop will learn a variety of techniques to successfully create colorful, expressive watercolor compositions including:

  • masking for dramatic lighting
  • wet-into-wet with pure pigment to model glowing natural forms with spontaneous color mixtures
  • negative painting
  • complementary and analogous splatter
  • calligraphic brushwork
  • drip wash

Students will learn when to employ these techniques for maximum effect and how to avoid common pitfalls .

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standard photo format

Students will  complete 2 paintings working in different formats.  Students will learn compositional considerations for working both horizontally and vertically, as well as designing a long, skinny format and a standard “photo” rectangle.

click this link to register

Happy painting

 

 

 

Poured Watercolor, part 2

In this post, I will show you how I take a poured watercolor composition from conception to finish.  In yesterday’s post, I noted the steps I feel are important in developing a successful poured painting.  Today, I will illustrate these points.

Critical concerns to Ensure a Successful Painting

  • The artist needs to make studies before painting.   For each mask layer to be successful, a careful drawing must be executed with accurate shapes and   values .  Additionally, the artist needs to consider all the elements, (line, color, texture, form,  and space, as well as shape and value), to insure a balanced composition.  Though pouring is primarily a studio technique and not suitable for pleine aire painting, poured watercolor develops technical skills, habits of mind, and the awareness of compositional elements that are critical in the field when an artist must work quickly to capture the light.
  • When initiating compositional studies, develop your ideas into connected shapes with three or more values.
  • Edges matter- draw and mask shapes very carefully, so the painting will read when the mask is removed.  Buy the best brushes you can afford for masking, (you will need a variety), and take good care of them, so the mask doesn’t destroy them.  Mask brushes and water containers must be dedicated for masking only.
  • Exploit lost & found edges, negative space, and counter-change when developing compositional studies.
  • Avoid details until the end, when the mask is off.
  • When the mask is off, find areas where the edges must be softened.

Make Studies:

The photograph below shows my daughter’s pony, about 17 years ago.  It is well suited for a poured demo, as it has large shapes and strong light.

Develop strong connected shapes in three values:

I made an initial drawing in three values.  You can see how the shapes connect- the white area of grass flows into the pony’s nose, and the dark area of grass flows into the pony’s legs.  This gives the painting nice use of negative space, and the lost and found edges compel viewer involvement.  In the actual composition, the white leg flows better into the white grassy area.  Without making the value study, I would not have noticed this.  At this stage there are few details, yet the painting clearly reads as a pony in his pasture.

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Consider each element of art:  (line, color, texture, form, space, shape, value)

I begin designing with shape, value, and space, then I consider the other four.  The light on the pony’s back and the lighter belly areas will define a well-rounded, solid form.  I will enhance this element after the mask is off, as I soften edges that define form.

Color, line, and texture come from my painted studies.IMG_1907

Raw sienna, cobalt blue, and manganese blue all produce granulation, which will add texture to both the pony and the foreground.  This color study tells me what to expect as the colors mix during the pour.

In making a small color study, I learned that my initial primary color triad- raw sienna (for yellow), burnt sienna (for red), and cobalt blue, needed a little punch to the earth pigments.  I added rose madder, because it is earthier than permanent rose, and manganese blue for its lovely green mixing qualities and granulation.  I use a limited palette of 4 blues, 3 reds, and 3 yellows for my paintings.   For poured paintings, I limit my palette to just 3-6 pigments.

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In the painted study, I connected the white leg into the white grassy shape, as noted above.  In painting the grass, I used a variety of long, short, and broken lines to convey both texture and to lead the eye into the pony, as subject.  Then I added juicy drops of color into the tail to blow tail lines that echo grass lines and blend into pasture.

Edges matter:

Shapes are carefully masked.  I use my value map, (first photo), to make order out of the chaos of masking and pouring.  Once the first mask is applied, it becomes difficult to see how the painting is progressing, so the initial studies are critical to organizing the pouring process.

 

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Preparing for the first pour.  Each pigment cup is labeled and dedicated for only that pigment, which I rinse & save after each pour.   Large syringes work well for mixing, and small syringes are handy when pouring into small spots.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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mask and first pour- raw sienna, burnt sienna, cobalt blue. Note very light underpainting of soft trees and clouds before the first mask was applied.

 

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After the final pour, removing the mask.
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After the mask was removed, beautiful passages of granulation and texture were revealed

 Avoid details and soften edges when the mask is removed:

Check back soon for how to resolve the painting once the mask has been removed.