Watercolor Workshops in Gunnison & Montrose Offered for November 2017

Registration for watercolor workshops in Montrose and Gunnison are open. All levels are welcome.  Beginners will be given extra support; experienced painters will be given design challenges to deepen their understanding while practicing a variety of painting techniques.  Workshop participation benefits your community arts centers.

Gunnison: “Make a Splash: Watercolor”  offered through the Gunnison Arts Center, two  hour weekly class, Wednesdays, November 1 – December 13. 6:00 – 8:00 pm. (No class Thanksgiving week.)  Each week we explore new techniques and ideas.  You will have a week to practice each lesson’s content, with new lessons building on previous class material.  Bring your weekly practice projects for extra guidance and critique.  Instruction and materials for each class: $110/student, $93.50/members.  Use the link below to register in Gunnison:

GUNNISON REGISTRATION

Montrose: “Getting Loose” offered through the Montrose Center for the Arts, six hour Saturday workshop, November 11 –  10am – 4pm  Workshop $60; materials list available for those who have their own watercolor supplies, or purchase supplies from instructor: $20.   Follow up support is offered free of charge to registered participants after the workshop.  Use the link below to register in Montrose:

MONTROSE REGISTRATION

Born to Run

Do you love the magic of watercolor?  Are you looking for ways to harness the spontaneity of watercolor paints?  Do you want to create fresh, colorful compositions?  Would looser techniques improve your paintings?  These watercolor classes will teach you to paint with confidence by mastering:

  • a variety of watercolor techniques
  • color theory
  • design principles

Put all that together for lively, punchy, and/or compelling works of art!

Fall classes will cover seasonal subject matter.  You will learn to create lovely subjects for holiday cards.  All levels welcome.  Beginners will be given extra support; experienced painters will be given design challenges to deepen their understanding and ability to convey meaning.  All registered learners can receive online follow-up support free of charge.

 

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Materials List for Watercolor Workshops

In response to the request to post a materials list for my workshops, here it is:

MATERIALS & SUPPLIES FOR WATERCOLOR WORKSHOP:

  • pencils, erasers, & sketchbook (or white printer paper for sketching ideas and doing practice studies)
  • 1/2 sheet of watercolor paper- 140# cold press cut to measure 15” x 22” (I recommend Arches brand because it has superior sizing which allows water and paint to flow on the surface without the paper fibers swelling)
  • metal yardstick (for tearing paper into smaller sizes. I will be discussing how different formats change the focus of a composition.)
  • tube watercolors in basic triad- (At the very minimum, you will need a red, a yellow, & a blue. Transparent colors will yield better results than opaque colors for this workshop. I would suggest at least 6 colors, a cool and a warm of each primary. Colors I use: Permanent Rose- cool red; Windsor Red- warm red; Cobalt Blue- almost pure blue, leans cool, good for skies; Windsor Blue Green Shade- warmish blue, mixes well with yellow for pure greens; Hansa Yellow- almost pure yellow, mixes well for oranges and greens; Raw Sienna- transparent earth yellow, somewhat neutralized, warmish. I also like to have Burnt Sienna on my palette.)
  • palette (for holding pigments and mixing paint;you could use a ceramic or plastic white plate from the dollar store.)
  • variety of paintbrushes (At the very minimum, you will need a small round brush for details; 1/2” flat brush for drawing, blocking, lifting, and dry-brush techniques; & large round brush for washes- at least #10 size. I use these 6 brushes: round brushes- #2, #6, #12; flat brushes- 1/2”, 1” 2” size chart: link for watercolor brush size chart You can find inexpensive watercolor brush sets at JoAnn’s craft stores.)
  • water containers (at least two- one for washing brushes, and one for pure water which you will use for washes and color mixing. Minimum size for the washing container is 2 quarts; anything smaller gets too polluted too quickly, & you will be constantly stopping to change water. Good size for the pure water container is at least 1 pint.)
  • spray bottle for water (handy, but not critical. I like to spritz my palette to keep the pigments fresh. You can also get effects with a spray bottle, so feel free to explore this option.)
  • sponges (at least two- I can’t paint without 3. I also like to have a few rags close at hand made from old towels about 6” x 8”. Some people like to use paper towels, but I find the clutter of used paper towels too messy, as well as not environmentally sustainable.)
  • backing board and mounting materials (I use plywood pieces that have been varnished. For smaller compositions, I don’t bother to stretch and staple my paper. Instead, I use masking tape to mount dry watercolor paper to the board. Other options- MDF or other composition board from Home Depot, a thick grade of foam core, or in a pinch- very heavy cardboard.
  • Besides staples and masking tape, you can also mount paper to your board with spring clips.)
  • easel (or you can paint flat on a table.)
  •  liquid mask (At the very minimum, get liquid mask and a small round cheap brush. I prefer to use a mask pen for most of my work. Daniel Smith is my preference because it come with 5 nibs, and they are easiest to clean. http://www.dickblick.com/products/daniel-smith- masking-fluid/ I also use Grafix masking fluid for for applying mask with a brush and to refill the Daniel Smith pen. http://www.dickblick.com/products/grafix-incredible-white- mask-liquid-frisket/ Also look for a rubber cement pickup for removing mask, available through Blick.)
  • masking tools- you need dedicated tools that you will use only for masking, (including a separate water container, rags, and a cheap, small brush. Never mix your masking tools with your painting tools. For applying mask with a brush, you will also need liquid soap. Lately I have been using a small bar of hotel soap, which I reapply often to keep my application brush free of mask.)

Registration for “Getting Loose” Watercolor Workshop Open

This Saturday, September 29, 2017 from 10 AM – 4PM

a watercolor workshop will be held to benefit The Montrose Center for the Arts to raise funds for the Center to acquire a building for visual, performance, and educational events.

Getting Loose

is a series of watercolor workshops with a focus on playful, colorful compositions for the beginner, as well as the advanced painter.  Extra support assists beginners, and compositional challenges stimulate the advanced painter.  Each workshop explores new techniques, skills, and design concepts.  Pop Culture

This session we will concentrate on these design principles:FullSizeRender (1)

  • balance
  • harmony
  • movement
  • pattern/rhythm

while we play with the following watercolor techniques:

  • wet into wet color mixing
  • dry brush
  • negative painting
  • value control
  • graded wash
  • creating texture
  • line control
  • stamping
  • mixing “black” from primary color pigments

Registration is still open:  Call the Montrose Community Foundation to reserve your slot today:  970-596-5555

 

Anatomy of a Portrait

“Redheads Have More Fun”  portrait of Willy

I have been working on a commissioned portrait of a beautiful 8 year old chestnut warmblood gelding.  Commissions require extra care, because we all have unique perspectives based on our experiences.  I wanted my vision to capture the horse’s sweet generous nature and the owner’s expectations.

I took extra care with the pencil study, being careful with Willy’s anatomy, his stunning drop-dead-gorgeous-good-looks and conformation, as well as his sunny personality.  I took extra time drawing his face, as the face and especially the eyes are the window to the spirit.

willy 1
pencil study

When the pencil study was complete, I did a value map.  I would recommend this step to anyone who wants to ensure success with a studied composition.  This process is not suitable for alla prima quick painting, but it works out many of the compositional problems that could crop up in a larger studio work.  My process is to find 3 values- dark, medium, and light.  I combine close values from the pencil study into larger connected shapes.  When I get to the painting stage, I keep the values accurate, and add a variety of color within the value shapes.  This variety of color enlivens the painting’s surface and the subject of the painting.  I also like to create lost-and-found edges at this point.  Where the sunlight touches the edge of the horse’s body, I have allowed the shapes to merge with the background- (horse’s left front leg and hoof.)

willy #2
Value map

The next step is the underpainting.  The underpainting sets the tone/temperature for the completed work, as this glaze will glow from within.  I have a warm golden wash in a variety of tones and tints- (hansa yellow, gamboge, raw sienna, burnt sienna).  I masked the areas of white- blaze and socks, and left those white areas in shadow blank- no underpainting.  For this portrait, I want a warm painting with distinct blue shadows on the horse’s socks and nose, so I saved those shapes for later painting.

willy #3.JPG
underpainting

After the underpainting was dry, I painted the background.  I wanted a very soft, light background that wouldn’t compete with the horse.  I used both blues for contrast and yellows for harmony.  When the background was dry, I built up shapes, added color, and worked from light to dark, using my value map.  As the body was taking shape, I switched to a smaller brush to complete the face.  The face slowed the process down, as stated before, an artist must capture the soul here.  When the horse was complete, I added energy in the foreground with lively brushstroke and splattered color.  I wanted to convey the energy of a joyful gallop and the impression of a flowery meadow.

willy

This work will be previewed at my Open House Sept 29, 2017 5-7 PM at Backstreet Street Bagels & Gallery.    To purchase a painting or commission a work, use this link:     purchase painting

“Poured Watercolor” Workshop in beautiful Telluride Colorado

FullSizeRender

The wildflowers are blooming, the mountains shine, and rainbows appear in the evening light.  Summertime in Telluride!  It’s time for a weekend mountain getaway.  Relax in beautiful Telluride while exploring some new watercolor techniques.  I will teach “Poured Watercolor” through the Ah Haa School of the Arts, Friday – Sunday, July 28 – 30, 2017. 

Break in the Clouds (1)

Forgo the brush and experiment with the process of pouring watercolor to produce paintings with unique results. Learn the pigment rules, color theory, and pouring techniques to give your watercolor paintings glowing results.  By pouring paint in a series of glazes,  underlying layers are preserved while developing a depth of color and enhancing luminosity.  Experience how this technique fosters a wide range of spontaneous colors while maintaining the harmony of a limited palette. Poured watercolor lends itself to a variety of subject matter.  All levels of painters are welcome, including first-time watercolorists.

To register, visit the Ah Haa School of the Arts registration page: POURED WATERCOLOR REGISTRATION

Watercolor Workshop June 10th, 2017

Benefit for the Montrose Center for the Arts

Looking for a way to loosen up your art? Are you interested in learning some new watercolor techniques? Have you wondered if you could be successful painting in watercolor? Do you love color? This class will offer ideas and techniques to create lively watercolor compositions.

%22sky lights%22
“Sky Lights” 10″ x 19″ $200

Beginners will be given extra support; experienced painters will be given compositional challenges.  All adult learners are welcome.  Supply list available, or purchase directly from instructor $20.

JUNE 10  10AM-4PM    fullsizerender

also Sept 30 & Nov 11

125 Merchant Drive, Montrose

workshop fee $60

workshop registration

 

Classes are not concurrent; there are no prerequisites to register. Each session will focus on different painting techniques for exploration and playful improvisations to enliven your watercolor paintings.

 

Garden

New Works 2017

I have two shows coming up this spring/summer.  My solo show opens in June at the Gunnison Gallery.  I will also be showing in June with Debbie Watkins, fiber artist and Lynn Vogle, fiber/metal artist at Backstreet in Montrose.  New works for these shows will feature my flower/garden paintings, watercolor works developed from my sketches and photos from Mexico this past winter, and of course more horse paintings.

This series of photos shows my process; how I create from initial studies/ ink drawing to final watercolor painting.

FullSizeRender
Ink drawing from sketch book

 

patz 2
Underpainting, blocking in shapes, directional lines, values
patz
finished painting; to purchase visit this link:  purchase form

“After School”

This painting was inspired by our winter trip to Mexico and my travel sketch journal.  Notice the strong connection between the mother and daughter.  Even with her back turned from the viewer, you can feel the strong attraction the daughter feels for her mother after a day at school.  It appears that this reunion occurs at this alcove daily.

Preliminary study in ink

guanajuato

Preliminary study in ink
in progress.jpg
Work in progress
After School
“After School”  watercolor, 15″ x 11″  $400

New Work: Watercolor Florals

orchidsOrchids is my newest painting.  After blocking in the basic composition, (two flowers on the upper and mid left and a long vertical for the stem), I created most of this work through negative painting.  I painted a series of dark saturated colors in a “blocky” wash, grading from very dark and cool at the top to warmer and lighter on the bottom.   I dropped a line of permanent rose from the top orchid, through the  bottom orchid , which creates movement through the background, as it also ties the two flowers together visually.  My goal was to create an abstract painting behind the flowers, which makes a more dynamic background.  Use of negative painting and lots of white highlights give the flowers drama.

I wanted the orchid stem to flow into the background at the bottom of the painting.  The background wash drips onto a light warm field of  raw sienna.  The orchid stem grades from dark blues-green into red and finally becomes part of the background drips.

Orchids was painted on 1/4 sheet of Arches 140# cold press paper.  Image size: 7.5″ x 22″  Matted size 12.5″ X 27″  $350

I will be teaching several watercolor workshops in 2017.  Each session will focus on different techniques, concepts, and effects.  Please visit my workshop link to find a class near you: watercolor workshop schedule

 

more new floral watercolors below:

 

2nd Saturday Sketch Class Returns to Backstreet

After a two month hiatus, sketch journal workshops are returning to Backstreet Bagels the second Saturday of each month from 2-4.  Classes are $25 and provide instruction and tips on technique and composition  in a supportive environment for you to explore sketching and journaling, blending text with image.

Join us this Saturday as we focus on indoor environments & decor.  Bring a sketch journal that accepts watermedia, fine line markers, watercolor kit, and a pencil.   On tap for Dec will be ideas for turning your sketch journal entries into Christmas cards.

Please use the following link to register

sketch journal registration

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5/28/15 entry copyright C Isgreen