Watercolor Paintings Accepted for Exhibition at Alpine Artists Holiday

Two paintings have been selected for exhibit in Ouray at the 58th Annual Alpine Artist

“Orchid’s Glow” 13″ x 27″ watercolor $350 Copyright C Isgreen

Holiday: “Orchid’s Glow” (pictured at right) and “Hillside Guanajuato” (featured above in preview).   The 58th annual Alpine Artists Holiday is a national juried exhibition, held every summer in the Ouray Community Center, 340 6th Ave, Ouray, CO.

OPENING RECEPTION:

JULY 25  7:00 PM

The show runs July 26-August 5, 2018.  Hours vary so visit the website: SHOW HOURS

“Orchid’s Glow” explores the glorious array of color occurring when light shines through the petals of an orchid.  Executed in a loose manner, flower forms are highlighted in a semi-abstract composition of light and shadow.

“Hillside Guanajuato” was painted on a recent trip to Mexico, in the capital city of Guanajuato, Guanajuato.  It depicts the charming jumble of sherbet homes that appear to almost tumble down each hillside.

Each painting is offered for sale during the show $350.  If you are unable to attend the show, visit the link to purchase online. PURCHASE PAINTINGS

 

Advertisements

Dream Horses at Pop Up Gallery

Montrose Center for the Arts and Weehawken Creative Arts present a “POP-UP GALLERY”  May 19 – May 31, 2018 at the Montrose Field House, corner of Rio Grande and Colorado Ave.   Join me for the Opening Reception, May 19 from 2-4 pm.  Light snacks and refreshments provided, and sales will be open!  Commission proceeds benefit the Center.

I am showing three of my Dream Horses, “Carousel,” “Spanish Walk,” and “Walk Like An Egyptian.”

Unlike my equine portraits and pastoral compositions, Dream Horses arise from a deeper, mysterious place- the confluence of my experiences, emotions, and energy.  Dream Horses are part nocturnal dreams and part dream goals; part whimsey, part wistfulness, and part triumph.  The process of mastery and harmony with the horse is a long dedicated journey traveled by luminaries Xenophon, de la Guérinière, Podhajsky, and mere mortals, such as myself.  Dreams Horses are elusive, unpredictable, free spirits.  During the artistic process, I release control to the emergence of the horse, which evolves from old world cultures, shared traditions, modern design, and playful exploration, synthesized with my experiences, (the sensation of fluid power, connection, and engagement upon his back) and profound feelings of awe and gratitude for everything the horse gives.  Dream Horses represent idealized beauty, power, grace, generosity, and wisdom.

 

“Spanish Walk”  &  “Walk Like An Egyptian”

watercolor 20″ x 16″ framed; $350 each;  to order visit purchase link

“Carousel”

%22Dream Horse #4.Carousel%22
“Dream Horse #4, Carousel” copyright Cheri Isgreen 2015

Watercolors Accepted to Colorado Visions

Paintings selected by juror, Sheri Farabaugh for 21th Annual Colorado Visions Exhibition of Art

May 1-31, 2018

Opening Reception May 10, 5:30-7:30

Westminster City Hall;  4800 W. 92nd Ave; Westminster, CO

Below is a short background to the paintings, “No Hoof; No Horse” and “Orchid’s Glow.”

No Hoof; No Horse

FullSizeRender
“No Hoof, No Horse” copyright C Isgreen  $500

tells the story of skill and craft behind the farrier’s art of hot shoeing.  A farrier carefully trims each hoof, then shapes each horseshoe to ensure comfort, balance, and performance.  Skilled work by talented farriers enhance the movement of sport horses, provide therapy for rehab horses, and prolong soundness for pleasure horses.   The painting captures the drama when a hot shoe is placed on a horse’s hoof to test for fit.  This painting spotlights the incredible trust horses place in their human partners.

Orchid’s Glow

Orchid's Glow

is a study in light.  Light reveals color and form.  The backlit forms of the orchids give the illusion of a glow from within each flower.  This semi-abstract composition puts the emphasis on design first and subject matter second.  Deep rich color give the painting harmony.  Strong movement and contrast provide interest.

Upcoming March Workshop at Ah Haa School for the Arts, Telluride, CO

Time to register for POURED WATERCOLOR with Cheri Isgreen

Fri-Sun March 23-25 10 am – 4 pm. $355

Forgo the brush & experiment with the process of pouring watercolor to produce looser paintings with unique results. Learn pigment rules & pouring techniques, as well as color theory, composition, & strategies for successful painting. Learn how pouring watercolors in a series of glazes allows depth of color to develop while preserving underlying layers and enhancing luminosity. Experience how poured watercolor fosters a wide range of spontaneous colors while maintaining the harmony of a limited palette. All levels of painters welcome, including first-time watercolorists. Extra support for new painters and design challenges for experienced artists will be provided.

REGISTER FOR POURED WATERCOLOR

Mas Color

Raining down the hillsides of Guanajuato is a riot of color, as depicted in the painting posted yesterday. The joyful colors permeate city life and culture. Everywhere it is expressed in art and song by los ciudadanos de Guanajuato. Valentine’s Day inspired the posted collage. (Mixed media: watercolor, ink, ephemera, old-style cinco centavo)

What a big surprise to learn that Valentine’s Day is celebrated en masse with colored lights and/or balloon displays throughout the barrios. The whole city turns out to celebrate with padres giving ninos small gifts of heart-shaped candies, balloons, and toys; sweethearts exchanging flowers and huge stuffed animals; families receiving blessings of small crosses on foreheads given by the parish priests; restaurants and bars hosting special dinners and live music; and plazas filled with families eating al fresco at the numerous pop up eateries.

The centerpiece of my collage features an invitation to El Midi Bistro. We enjoyed a three course meal with champagne while serenaded to the sounds of French cafe music in the style of Edith Piaffe.

The preview showcases la Virgen de San Juan de Los Lagos. After witnessing the pilgrimage from San Miguel de Allende, I became interested and did some research into the Candlemas Festival and pilgrimage of San Juan de los Lagos. The town is visited by over two million pilgrims each Candlemas. While in San Miguel, we were awakened at 6AM by 1,000 or more of the faithful, singing, and carrying banners and a statue on their way to San Juan de Los Lagos. From my research, I learned the statue is a representation of the Virgin de Los Lagos. The original statue is just 2′ tall, wears elegant gold trimmed clothing, a gold Byzantine crown, and stands on a crescent moon. With a new awareness, I began to see the Virgin in many places. While walking in the Pastita Barrio, I noticed her image in ceramic tiles on a modest house. (See Pastita Barrio). According to legend, in 1623 a young acrobat, a girl of seven, fell and impaled herself on daggers. The bereft family brought her to the chapel in preparation for burial. The church caretaker, Ana Lucia Antes placed an old statue of the Virgin of the Immaculate Conception with the body, instructing the family to keep their faith and pray with her. Within an hour, the lifeless body began to stir. Her father unwrapped the shroud to discover his daughter alive and unscathed. News of the miracle spread, and the 90-year old tattered statue, made of plastered cornmeal and orchid juice was sent to Guadalajara to be restored. Miraculously the statue arrived fully restored and has remained in pristine condition to this day. Today, the faithful make pilgrimages to the Virgin throughout the year, with thousands walking, even crawling or being pushed in wheelchairs, throughout Mexico to San Juan de los Lagos during the Candlemas celebrations. (Read the whole story here: Virgin de Los Lagos)

Many walls and casas are adorned with ceramic plaques telling their histories. My favorite is the plaque from the Prussian Consulate of 1864. I used two motifs from different plaques in my collage.

Colorful cut paper banners, called “papel picado,” are hung during celebrations, (also see Papel picado). Walking through a papel picado strewn street, one can’t help but feel festive.

Flowers abound in Mexico. The flowers in my collage came from a mural in one of the small family restaurants where we shared breakfast with friends. Last night for Valentines Day, flower vendors were set up on every plaza. I bought mine from the florist on Plaza de Embajadores. I made a new friend, as we discussed the joys of working in a flower shop, a job I held many years ago. I left with a hug, a kiss, and a exquisite bouquet. As I arranged them in water, I marveled at their exotic beauty and ready availability.

From murals to street art; graphic design to folk arts; indigenous clothing to painted houses; music to theater; food to flowers, Guanajuato abounds with “de colores.”

Guanajuato Color

The city of Guanajuato is a Unesco World Heritage site, named for its opulent Baroque and Neoclassical buildings, elegant plazas, and abundant theaters, museums, and galleries. Over and above, (quite literally) the rich heritage in Zona Central Historical, the city’s innate expression of color manifests itself in vibrant markets and neighborhoods. The city sits in a “valley bowl” with bright houses crammed into the steep slopes, ringing the city, and coloring the hillsides.

“Guanajuato Color” watercolor 16″ x 20″ $350

Mexican love of color is expressed everywhere from folk arts, to charming business signs and posters, to flower-filled balconies overlooking every street and callejon. (Stay tuned…….I have a post planned for this theme. Today is Valentines Day. Our landlady just gave us a most charming invitation to her restaurant for a special dinner and musical evening. “Musica Francesa” will feature French cafe-style music, in the vein of Edith Piaffe, one of my favorite singers. Our reservation is for 7:30).

Colorful Hillside

From above the classical theaters and baroque churches crammed within the labyrinthine alleyways of the city center, haphazard stacks of sherbet-colored houses rise along the hillsides in perfect disorganization…..Moon Guide to Guanajuato, p. 123 San Miguel de Allende, including Guanajuato & Queretaro, Julie Meade

This perfect description draws me to paint the city. Small watercolor 6″ x 9″ on Arches cold press watercolor block using my new Koi pocket field sketch box of pan watercolors and small travel brushes. The brushes and pan colors took some getting used too.

City of Frogs, part 2

Inspired by the city with a plaza celebrating frogs and another plaza celebrating singers, and a street named “Singing Frog.”

Mixed media: ink, watercolor, collage

2017 drawings on Calle Cantarranas

Read the post: Calle Cantarrana #1

Read the post: Calle Canterranas #2

28 Enero 2018. … A Day in the Park

Cogimos un autobus al Mercado Hidalgo y caminamos hasta el Jardin del Cantador

We have been learning the bus routes and stops. On Sunday morning we took the bus from our neighborhood to Central Historico. We picked up the bus at the beautiful Escuela Normal, (the teacher’s college.). It is an old ornate sandstone building built in the Colonial style. This is the main bus stop for the Presa neighborhood. Because we went by bus, instead of walking, we took a tunnel route. Because it was Sunday, everyone was out- families, teenage couples, groups of college students, and a handful of tourists. Once we hit Zona Central, the crowded sidewalks overflowed into the streets. By the time we hit Hildalgo Market, the streets were so clogged, no traffic could move. We disembarked the bus and headed to a large park called Garden of the Singer.

Though some flowers are blooming and shrubs are still green, the trees are mostly dormant, creating a mass of neutral greys. I decided this journal entry would be made in toned inks. Above the garden, homes are built into the hillside providing a splash of color to the winter landscape. This area could be loosely rendered with watercolor wash. The thin paper of the my bus ticket added a layer of complexity to the composition.

We were confused about how to return by bus. Everyone told us to catch the return bus “abajo,” but we could not find where the bus stopped down below. Yesterday we tried again to figure out the bus route home. Finally a college student showed us that the main upper stop was about half a block away from the lower return route. We walked back to Hildalgo Mercado and after some wandering, we found the stone staircase that took us to the bus stop in the tunnel. Once down there, we learned the little buses, (cambios), stopped at the first stop, so we had to walk deeper into the tunnel to catch the Presa bus. It has been very cold, and everyone rides the bus when the weather is bad. Several full buses passed us by. Eventually our bus arrived. We traveled in tunnels for a long while before finally surfacing at the Plaza Embajadors, (Plaza of the Ambassadors.). It was just a few more stops until we reached our stop at the Escuela Normal.